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River Rock Operating, LLC

 

River Rock Operating's Public Awareness Program

 

Federal pipeline safety regulations require pipeline operators to conduct continuing public awareness programs to provide pipeline safety information to four stakeholder audiences, including:

  • affected public, 

  • emergency officials,

  • local public officials, and 

  • excavators.

In order to implement its public awareness program, River Rock Operating contacts landowners, business owners, tenants, communities, Native American groups, excavators, municipal officials and emergency officials.   River Rock Operating’s Public Awareness Program focuses on several key groups near our pipelines and facilities:

Our neighbors;

Farmers and ranchers;

Emergency officials;

Excavators and contractors;

Public officials;

School officials 

You can click on this map link to determine whether our pipelines cross your land or area.

If you believe you are facing a pipeline emergency situation, ensure your own personal safety by moving to a safe place--then call 9-1-1 and River Rock Operating’s Toll Free Emergency Number 1-800-628-1600.

 

 

 

 

 

River Rock Operating’s Toll Free Emergency Number 1-800-628-1600.

Public Awareness for All Stakeholders

Pipelines are the safest, most efficient and most reliable way to transport energy resources. Pipelines play a vital role in our everyday lives, and they are essential to our quality of life and economy—moving the products necessary for transportation, heating and cooling our homes, producing our food supply and manufacturing consumer products.

River Rock Operating operates hundreds of miles of natural gas gathering pipelines and flow lines throughout several counties in Southeast Kansas and in Craig and Nowata Counties, Oklahoma. Our top priority is operating our pipeline network safely.

As a member of our public stakeholder groups, it is important for the members of the public along our pipeline right-of-way to:

  • Call 811 Before you Dig - if you plan on any soil-disturbing activities—including deep tilling, ditching, soil ripping, drain tile installation, digging fence posts, or building roads, sidewalks, driveways, ditches or buildings;

  • Know how and when to make a pipeline locate request, and how to excavate safely near our pipelines;

  • Know how to identify where pipelines may be located near you, and who operates them;

  • Know how to recognize a potential pipeline leak;

  • Know what to do in a pipeline emergency situation;

  • Know how we protect and maintain our pipelines; 

  • Know how to contact our offices to discuss activities within our rights-of-way; and 

  • Know how to report suspicious activity.

By staying aware, following safety precautions while working near pipelines, and keeping in touch with us about any concerns or issues, you can help prevent incidents and minimize their impacts.

For Emergency Officials

For emergency officials and responders, preparedness and quick response will help minimize the threat to the public and damage to the environment. We recognize the expertise that you possess as emergency responders. We are committed to strengthening our communication and collaboration through meetings, training exercises, personal contact, and information updates. We always appreciate hearing from you and encourage you to call at your convenience if you have any questions or concerns.

It is important for all emergency responders along our pipeline rights-of-way to:

  • Know how to identify where pipelines may be located in your community, and who operates them;

  • Know how to recognize a potential leak (discussed below)

  • Know what to do in a pipeline emergency situation (discussed below and in the pdf document that you can access by clicking here);

  • Know what River Rock Operating does to prepare for, and respond to, emergencies;

  • Know how we protect and maintain our pipelines; 

  • Know how to contact us regarding our rights-of-way; and 

  • Know how to report suspicious activity around our pipelines.

Preparedness means developing integrated response plans based on open communication and teamwork. River Rock Operating strives to ensure that local emergency services have the information they need to respond appropriately. We will hold training sessions in select locations to keep employee skills fresh, and to ensure that our co-ordination with local emergency responders is complete and effective.

Transmission pipeline mapping and GIS file access

For Emergency Officials in the United States, the U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Administration (PHMSA) provides secure access to county-level maps through the National Pipeline Mapping System (NPMS) Pipeline Information Management Mapping Application (PIMAA).

The NPMS PIMAA provides a greater level of detail than what is available through the NPMS Public Viewer. Additionally, approved PIMAA users can request GIS data of all transmission pipelines within their jurisdiction. NPMS does not provide maps of local distribution or gathering lines.

To request PIMAA access, visit this link to apply. For general maps and inquiries into the NPMS system, the Public Viewer is available here.  For access to River Rock’s pipeline map, click here.

For Farmers and Ranchers

It is important to note that over time, normal surface erosion, previous digging projects, heavy rains, floods and droughts can impact the depth of cover over our pipelines. Therefore, calling 811 before you dig is very important and is the safest step before disturbing the soil in any way.

Also, remember that pipeline damage—even if it does not immediately result in a visible leak – should be immediately reported to River Rock Operating. Protective coating damage or even a small dent in the pipeline could cause a major problem in the future.  Therefore, it is very important to report any pipeline damage – small or large.

For Excavators

As an excavator, developer, or utility company, your commitment to safe construction practices reduces the risk of pipeline damage, and ensures both your safety and the safety of those who live and work along the line. It is important for all excavators and contractors along our pipeline rights-of-way to:

  • Call 811 Before you Dig - if you plan on any soil-disturbing activities—including deep tilling, ditching, soil ripping, drain tile installation, digging fence posts, or building roads, sidewalks, driveways, ditches or buildings – you should first call 811 and request a pipeline locator to mark River Rock’s pipelines in the area;

  • Know how and when to make a pipeline locate request, and how to excavate safely near our pipelines;

  • Know how to identify where pipelines may be located near you, and who operates them;

  • Know how to recognize a potential pipeline leak;

  • Know what to do in a pipeline emergency situation;

  • Know how we protect and maintain our pipelines; 

  • Know how to contact our offices to discuss activities within our rights-of-way; and 

  • Know how to report suspicious activity.

It's your responsibility as an excavator to make the one-call notification, and—at all times—excavate safely. River Rock Operating representatives must be onsite when excavation is taking place near our pipeline rights-of-way. If you strike a pipeline while digging, it's essential that you notify River Rock Operating immediately. 

For Public Officials

As a public official, you also make an important contribution to our safety practices. You can play an important role in the safety of residents who live and work near pipelines by doing the following:

  • Know how to recognize a potential pipeline leak;

  • Know what to do in a pipeline emergency situation;

  • Know how we protect and maintain our pipelines; 

  • Know how to contact our offices to discuss activities within our rights-of-way; and 

  • Know how to report suspicious activity.

For School Officials

As a school official, you can also play an important role when it comes to pipeline safety. It’s important for administrators, teachers and staff at schools near our pipeline rights-of-way to:

  • Call 811 Before You or Your School Digs Around the Pipeline - if you plan on any soil-disturbing activities at or near your school —including ditching, soil ripping, drain tile installation, digging fence posts, or building roads, sidewalks, driveways, ditches or buildings – you should first call 811 and request a pipeline locator to mark the location of River Rock’s lines;

  • Know how and when to make a pipeline locate request, and how to excavate safely near our pipelines;

  • Know how to identify where pipelines may be located near your school, and who operates them;

  • Know how to recognize a potential pipeline leak;

  • Know what to do in a pipeline emergency situation;

  • Know how to contact our offices to discuss activities within our rights-of-way; and 

  • Know how to report suspicious activity.

We would be pleased to meet with school officials, faculty members or maintenance supervisors to provide information about our pipeline systems and emergency response plans. It is critical that pipeline emergency response is included in the emergency response and evacuation plan for schools located near pipelines.

 

 

Recognizing a leak

 

 

In the unlikely event of a pipeline leak, one or any combination of the items listed below can typically help you recognize a leak.  If you do detect a leak, please call River Rock Operating’s Toll Free Emergency Number 1-800-628-1600 to report the leak.

 

You might see:

  • colored liquid on the ground

  • flames, if gas or a leak has ignited

  • continuous bubbling in wet areas, or at a pond, creek or river

  • discolored snow

  • dead/dying/discolored vegetation in an otherwise green area

  • a steam-like cloud or fog

  • a white vapor stream or mist-like cloud

  • unexpected frost buildup on the ground

  • dirt being blown or appearing to be thrown into the air

You might hear:

  • an unusual roaring, blowing, hissing or loud whistling sound

You might smell:

  • an unusual odor similar to diesel fuel, gasoline, sulfur, or rotten egg

  • for non-odorized pipelines like River Rock’s pipelines: a slight smell similar to diesel fuel or oil

Most natural gas has a naturally occurring slight petroleum smell similar to diesel, oil or propane.   However, this is not always the case because methane gas (which is the main component of natural gas), is odorless.

 

Safe digging and damage prevention – Call 811 before you dig

 

To protect people and the environment, and to reduce the risk of pipeline damage, federal and provincial/state laws require anyone planning a ground disturbance or excavation activity near a pipeline right-of-way (ROW) to request a pipeline locator to locate and mark the pipeline in advance.

In the United States, 811 is the free, FCC-designated national one-call number that connects a caller from anywhere in the country to the appropriate local one-call center. Anyone conducting soil-disturbing activities in the U.S. should call 811 before you dig. 

Although pipelines are identified by above-ground markers in certain areas, the markers should never be used as a reference for the exact location of the pipeline. Also, as the depth of pipelines and other underground utilities can change over the years due to erosion, previous digging projects or uneven surfaces, there are varying depths to underground pipelines. Thus, it is very important to contact your local state/provincial one-call service provider, or River Rock Operating directly, at least three days before you do any type of excavation in any area that you believe might be located on or near a River Rock pipeline right-of-way.

Activities that require a pipeline locate request include, but are not limited to:

  • fixing or improving an existing ditch, drain tile or fence

  • building a berm

  • constructing roads, paving, parking, driveways, ditches, railways, overhead or underground utilities

  • installing fence posts

  • altering the grade or deep tilling the soil

  • operating non-agricultural equipment or vehicles on or over the right-of-way (ROW)

  • encroaching on the ROW with services or other utilities

The construction of buildings or foundations, and stockpiling of materials or burn piles, are also prohibited on the ROW.

River Rock Operating representatives must be on-site to supervise any excavation near the ROW.

For installations or to operate a vehicle or mobile equipment across any of River Rock Operating’s ROW, written permission from River Rock is required. Depending on the installation, approval could take up to 10 days, so please plan ahead. Please contract River Rock Operating at 1-800-628-1600 to discuss your specific ROW questions.

What to do in the event of an emergency

If you suspect a pipeline emergency, please follow these directives.

Immediately, in any emergency situation:

  • Leave the area

  • Abandon any mechanized equipment. Move as far away from the leak as possible, avoiding contact with escaping liquids and gases. Warn others to stay away

  • Move upwind, not downwind

  • Avoid low lying areas

  • Call 9-1-1 and report the leak or fire

  • Call the toll-free, 24-hour River Rock number 1-800-628-1600 to report the leak

  • Do not smoke or light matches

  • Do not drive your automobile near the leak.  Your gas engine and exhaust are very hot and could ignite the gas

  • Follow instructions provided to you by River Rock representatives and local emergency responders

What you should not do:

  • Do not touch or go near any liquid, gas or vapor cloud that might have come from a pipeline or facility leak

  • Do not start your vehicle or any equipment that could be a potential ignition source

  • Do not smoke or light a match, and avoid heating sources or making sparks

  • Do not turn on or off anything that may create a spark, including cell phones, pagers, flashlights, keyless entry remotes, vehicle alarms, and light switches, until you are in a safe location

  • Do not attempt to operate pipeline valves

  • Do not try to turn valves

  • Do not attempt to extinguish any flames or fires

  • Do not remain in a building if the smell is stronger inside than outside (for crude oil pipelines)

In the event of an emergency, River Rock Operating’s emergency response plan will immediately go into effect, and we will work with local emergency responders to identify and resolve the issue. Residents may be asked to evacuate if it is no longer safe to be in the area, or to shelter-in-place if there is something unsafe in the environment. The instructions given to you will depend on your location in relation to the incident or release site.

If you are indoors or near a building and you do not know the location of the leak, shelter-in-place until emergency responders or River Rock Operating provides you with additional instructions.

What to do if you see suspicious activity around River Rock’s pipelines

If you see any suspicious activity around River Rock’s pipelines, please immediately call our toll free, 24-hour River Rock number 1-800-628-1600.  We will then immediately dispatch personnel to investigate the activity and contact law enforcement if required. 

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Know what's below.
         
Call before you dig.

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